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4 March 2007

Geographical processes in bushfires

What is a geographical process exactly? Well it is basically any process that changes the geography of a region.

So in the case of bushfire the geography can sometimes change before, during and after a fire.

There are physical geographic processes.

For example, before a bushfire usually there is a period of drought. Droughts are caused in part by changes in the Earth's climate such as changes in the sea temperature, like El Niño effects.

Human geographic processes

There are also human geographic processes. This would include things such as how close houses are built near bushfire areas.

see bushfires and communities for more info

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flames moving up a landscape

Above is an example of how the physical landscape can have an effect on the way a bushfire progresses. For example a fire can move up a slope more quickly than on flat ground.

Geography after a fire

Even after a fire the geography of a region can change. For example ground plants may be burnt and the soil can be exposed to more erosion if there is a sudden down pour of rain.

After an area has burnt there is also a change in the amount of evaporation from plants that used to be there but once burnt can no longer provide moisture.

 

 

 
 
 

 


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