International talk like a pirate day

International Talk Like a Pirate Day (ITLAPD, September 19) is a parodic holiday created in 1995 by John Baur (Ol' Chumbucket) and Mark Summers (Cap'n Slappy), of Albany, Oregon,  U.S., who proclaimed September 19 each year as the day when everyone in the world should talk like a pirate. 

For example, an observer of this holiday would greet friends not with "Hello," but with "Ahoy, matey!" The holiday, and its observance, springs from a romanticized view of the Golden Age of Piracy.


The origins of the ‘pirate’ accent

English actor Robert Newton, who specialized in portraying pirates, especially Long John Silver in the 1950 Disney film Treasure Island and the 1954 Australian film Long John Silver and the title character in the 1952 film Blackbeard the Pirate,  is described as the "patron saint" of Talk Like a Pirate Day. 

TREASURE_ISLAND


Newton was born in Dorset and educated in Cornwall, and it was his native West Country dialect, which he used in his portrayal of Long John Silver and Blackbeard, that some contend is the origin of the standard "pirate accent”.  This was parodied in the 1950s and 1960s by British comedian Tony Hancock. 

Origins of Arrr!!

The archetypal pirate grunt "Arrr!" (alternatively "Rrrr!" or "Yarrr!") first appeared in fiction as early as 1934 in the film Treasure Island starring Lionel Barrymore, and was used by a character in the 1940 novel Adam Penfeather, Buccaneer by Jeffrey Farnol.

 However, it was Robert Newton's use of it in the classic 1950 Disney film Treasure Island that popularized the interjection and made it widely remembered. 

It’s thought that the rolling "rrr", a distinctive element of the speech of the West Country of England, has been associated with pirates because of the West Country's strong maritime heritage, where for many centuries fishing was the main industry (and smuggling a major unofficial one), and where there were several major ports. As a result, West Country speech in general, and Cornish speech in particular, may have been a major influence on a generalized British nautical speech.

Jolly Roger is the traditional English name for the flags flown to identify a pirate ship about to attack, during the early 18th century (the later part of the "Golden Age of Piracy").


The flag most commonly identified as the Jolly Roger today, the skull and crossbones symbol on a black flag, was used during the 1710s by a number of pirate captains including Black Sam Bellamy, Edward England, and John Taylor, and it went on to become the most commonly used pirate flag during the 1720s.

Facebook language option

The is an option in the setting section for language to set pages to English(pirate)



Adapted from: International Talk Like a Pirate Day. (2016, September 22). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 07:42, September 23, 2016, from https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=International_Talk_Like_a_Pirate_Day&oldid=740605539


Jolly Roger. (2017, September 15). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 05:14, September 19, 2017 , from https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Jolly_Roger&oldid=800789345


References

Original 'talk Like a pirate day’ webpage